Monday, June 1, 2020

ANCIENT HISTORY OF CAMBODIA




A carbon-l4 dating from a cave in northwestern Cambodia suggests that people using stone tools lived in the cave as early as 4000 B.C., and rice has been grown on Cambodian soil since well before the A.D. 1st century. The first Cambodians likely arrived long before either of these dates. They probably migrated from the north, although nothing is known about their language or their way of life.
Source: Tourism of Cambodia

The earliest evidence of habitation in Cambodia has been found at Loang Spean in northwestern Cambodia. It was occupied beginning around 5000 B.C. by people who lived in caves, polished stones and decorated pottery with cord and comb markings. The first evidence of village-like settlements comes from a site called Bas-Plateaux, in southeastern Cambodia, first occupied in the 2nd century B.C.

The earliest evidence of human habitation in the Angkor area has been dated at 5000 B.C. and was in the form of artifacts and remains from pre-Bronze-Age hunter-gatherers. Samrog Sen, in central Cambodia not too far from Angkor Wat, was occupied around 1500 B.C. The bones found at the site are similar to those of modern Cambodians. The use of metal began around 1000 B.C. and became widespread by 500 B.C.

According to the Library of Congress: “By the first century A.D., the inhabitants of had developed relatively stable, organized societies, which had far surpassed the primitive stage in culture and technical skills. The most advanced groups lived along the coast and in the lower Mekong River valley and delta regions, where they cultivated irrigated rice and kept domesticated animals. Scholars believe that these people may have been Austroasiatic in origin and related to the ancestors of the groups who now inhabit insular Southeast Asia and many of the islands of the Pacific Ocean. They worked metals, including both iron and bronze, and possessed navigational skills. Mon-Khmer people, who arrived at a later date, probably intermarried with them.
Source: Library of Congress, December 1987

 According to Lonely Planet: “Much of the southeast was a vast, shallow gulf that was progressively silted up by the mouths of the Mekong, leaving pancake-flat, mineral-rich land ideal for farming. Evidence of cave-dwellers has been found in the northwest of Cambodia. Carbon dating on ceramic pots found in the area shows that they were made around 4200 BC, but it is hard to say whether there is a direct relationship between these cave-dwelling pot makers and contemporary Khmers. Examinations of bones dating back to around 1500 BC, however, suggest that the people living in Cambodia at that time resembled the Cambodians of today. Early Chinese records report that the Cambodians were ‘ugly’ and ‘dark’ and went about naked. However, a healthy dose of skepticism is always required when reading the culturally chauvinistic reports of imperial China concerning its ‘barbarian’ neighbors.
Source: Lonely Planet

The following 600 years saw powerful Khmer kings dominate much of present day Southeast Asia, from the borders of Myanmar east to the South China Sea and north to Laos. It was during this period that Khmer kings built the most extensive concentration of religious temples in the world - the Angkor temple complex. The most successful of Angkor's kings, Jayavarman II, Indravarman I, Suryavarman II and Jayavarman VII, also devised a masterpiece of ancient engineering: a sophisticated irrigation system that includes barays (gigantic man-made lakes) and canals that ensured as many as three rice crops a year. Part of this system is still in use today.

Source: Factsanddetails


To be continued

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Kingdom of Cambodia


Cambodia Geography 



Cambodia is a country in mainland Southeast Asia, bordering Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, the Gulf of Thailand. The country is situated in its entirety inside the tropical Indomalayan ecozone and the Indochina Time zone (ICT).

Cambodia's main geographical features are the low lying Central Plain that includes the Tonlé Sap basin, the lower Mekong River flood-plains and the Bassac River plain surrounded by mountain ranges to the north, east, in the south-west and south. The central lowlands extend into Vietnam to the south-east. The south and south-west of the country constitute a 443 km (275 mi) long coast at the Gulf of Thailand, characterized by sizable mangrove marshes, peninsulas, sandy beaches and headlands and bays. Cambodia's territorial waters account for over 50 islands. The highest peak is Phnom Aural, sitting 1,810 meters, (5,938 ft) above sea level.

The landmass is bisected by the Mekong river, which at 486 km (302 mi) is the longest river in Cambodia. After extensive rapids, turbulent sections and cataracts in Laos, the river enters the country at Stung Treng province, is predominantly calm and navigable during the entire year as it widens considerably in the lowlands. The Mekong's waters disperse into the surrounding wetlands of central Cambodia and strongly affect the seasonal nature of the Tonlé Sap lake.

Two third of the country's population live in the lowlands, where the rich sediment deposited during the Mekong's annual flooding makes the agricultural lands highly fertile. The forests, low mountain ranges and local eco-regions still retain much of their natural potential and although still home to the largest areas of contiguous and intact forests in mainland Southeast Asia. 

The majority of the country lies within the Tropical savanna climate zone, as the coastal areas in the South and West receive noticeably more and steady rain before and during the wet season. These areas constitute the easternmost fringes of the south-wes.t monsoon, determined to be inside the Tropical monsoon climate. Countrywide there are two seasons of relatively equal length, defined by varying precipitation as temperatures and humidity are generally high and steady throughout the entire year.

Pre-History


ANCIENT HISTORY OF CAMBODIA

A carbon-l4 dating from a cave in northwestern Cambodia suggests that people using stone tools lived in the cave as early as 4000 B.C., and rice has been grown on Cambodian soil since well before the A.D. 1st century. The first Cambodians likely arrived long before either of these dates. They probably migrated from the north, although nothing is known about their language or their way of life.

Source: Tourism of Cambodia

The earliest evidence of habitation in Cambodia has been found at Loang Spean in northwestern Cambodia. It was occupied beginning around 5000 B.C. by people who lived in caves, polished stones and decorated pottery with cord and comb markings. The first evidence of village-like settlements comes from a site called Bas-Plateaux, in southeastern Cambodia, first occupied in the 2nd century B.C.


The earliest evidence of human habitation in the Angkor area has been dated at 5000 B.C. and was in the form of artifacts and remains from pre-Bronze-Age hunter-gatherers. Samrog Sen, in central Cambodia not too far from Angkor Wat, was occupied around 1500 B.C. The bones found at the site are similar to those of modern Cambodians. The use of metal began around 1000 B.C. and became widespread by 500 B.C.

 According to the Library of Congress: “By the first century A.D., the inhabitants of had developed relatively stable, organized societies, which had far surpassed the primitive stage in culture and technical skills. The most advanced groups lived along the coast and in the lower Mekong River valley and delta regions, where they cultivated irrigated rice and kept domesticated animals. Scholars believe that these people may have been Austroasiatic in origin and related to the ancestors of the groups who now inhabit insular Southeast Asia and many of the islands of the Pacific Ocean. They worked metals, including both iron and bronze, and possessed navigational skills. Mon-Khmer people, who arrived at a later date, probably intermarried with them.
Source: Library of Congress, December 1987


 According to Lonely Planet: “Much of the southeast was a vast, shallow gulf that was progressively silted up by the mouths of the Mekong, leaving pancake-flat, mineral-rich land ideal for farming. Evidence of cave-dwellers has been found in the northwest of Cambodia. Carbon dating on ceramic pots found in the area shows that they were made around 4200 BC, but it is hard to say whether there is a direct relationship between these cave-dwelling pot makers and contemporary Khmers. Examinations of bones dating back to around 1500 BC, however, suggest that the people living in Cambodia at that time resembled the Cambodians of today. Early Chinese records report that the Cambodians were ‘ugly’ and ‘dark’ and went about naked. However, a healthy dose of skepticism is always required when reading the culturally chauvinistic reports of imperial China concerning its ‘barbarian’ neighbors.
Source: Lonely Planet
The following 600 years saw powerful Khmer kings dominate much of present day Southeast Asia, from the borders of Myanmar east to the South China Sea and north to Laos. It was during this period that Khmer kings built the most extensive concentration of religious temples in the world - the Angkor temple complex. The most successful of Angkor's kings, Jayavarman II, Indravarman I, Suryavarman II and Jayavarman VII, also devised a masterpiece of ancient engineering: a sophisticated irrigation system that includes barays (gigantic man-made lakes) and canals that ensured as many as three rice crops a year. Part of this system is still in use today.

Source: Factsanddetails 


Tourist Attraction in Cambodia (To be updated)


Khmer History (To be updated)


Thursday, July 11, 2019

Sabara Deal


Deal & Experience Differently!


Explore the magnificent temples of Angkor with your first-hand-experienced local guide. Riding man-made Tuk-Tuk to ancient temples and explore the lesser-known temples of Banteay Srei and Banteay Samre. Visit Ta Prohm, a beautiful temple engulfed in massive trees and roots. These are what we customize your holiday in the heritage land.

Book your ACCOMMODATION now to get the BEST RATE ever and stay in spacious Deluxe Room with pool view. Only USD42.00 for 2 person per night. The rate is included:

- Round trip airport transfers
- Daily buffet breakfast
- City shuttle with free use of local cellphone
- All applicable taxes
- Fresh fruit upon arrival
- 30 minutes Khmer traditional massage each during the stay



CONDITIONS:
- Booking made via hotel website, e-mail and phone call only
- The rate is applied for deluxe room only and not for PEAK PERIOD. Please reach us for further
information
- Booking must be guaranteed by a valid credit card. VISA, Master and JCB accepted.
- Validate till 31st October, 2019

CANCELLATION POLICIES:
- If cancellation made more than 3 days prior to arrival, there is no charge applied
- If cancellation made within 3 days and less prior to arrival, 50% charge from you credit card will be applies
- No-show will be fully charged

Explore our SITE for more services and facilities 



Thursday, February 7, 2019

Community Work

I- Hotel Background



“We are Cambodian entrepreneurs who start with a business in Phnom Penh and expand to Siem Reap with tourism-related which is a new initiative for us. Despite this, we love it and proud to receive heart-warming feedback from our guest.”

II- Hotel overview


Perfectly located merely 15 minute from the world re-known Angkor Complex and only 4 minutes from Siem Reap International Airport, Sabara Angkor Resort & Spa situated in the tranquil part of Siem Reap away from the bustling downtown area, while remaining very accessible to any part of the city within 10 minute ride.
The epitome of peaceful Khmer style and comfort, guest rooms and suites all command magnificent swimming pool views surrounded by lefty garden. Intelligently designed, marrying traditional style elements with all the conveniences of state-of-the-art technology and the Sabara Angkor Resort & Spa personal touch service, guests are guaranteed a memorable stay.

Sabara Angkor Resort & Spas’ uniqueness

Cambodian owned and run
Personal touch service
Tranquil location and Cambodian architect design theme
Community support
Environmental care

Our Story
Established in 2017 by Cambodians, and run by first-hand experienced Cambodians, with our guest satisfactions at heart. 

Our Philosophy
Connect with the local communities and participate in meaningful causes. 

Our Mission
Formulate and exercise the highest standard of hospitality service possible to each and every guest.

III- Project Background


Not only with business have we focused, but also social work since we grow up here in the ancient land and realize there are things we could give 

back too. We love helping each other especially contributing to our young under privileged for a better education and job opportunity.

How do we help? 
Currently, we undertake a project to fill the land within the school premises and complete the school fence which remains 30 meter in length. The project details are as the following:

Fulfilling land in school premises:
To complete the land filling, we need 100 trucks of land. This will prevent flooding during wet season and create a good environment for the school. In addition to this, the school director will be able to create activities for all young students such as sport training more easily.

Build the remaining fence: 
30 meters length of school fence still remains and we would like to complete this after finishing the land filling. This will secure and protect the school from local animals surrounding.





IV- Financial Matters


Hotel takes responsibility for all expenses of the project. The expenses we collect from hotel activities include:

- Cooking Class:
Joining our cooking class means you have already supported our project. 
Cooking Class details:

All cooking class begins with a tour to our local wet market to purchase fresh ingredients. This is accompanied with a professional guide.

Back to hotel with all the ingredients, you cook under our chef guidance and the delicious output of your labor at our Royal Spice Restaurant.

Note: Cooking class can be taken either at hotel or in the local village.



- Apsara Performance:

We set Apsara Performance twice a week which is regularly performed on Tuesday and Friday of the week commencing from 19:00 till 20:00 at the hotel pool pavilion
Hotel residents and non-residents are welcomed with free access. Guests are encouraged to order from our menu while happily watching the traditional show.


- By the day tour package:

Buying one or more days is your option. This tour will include:
Man-made Tuk-Tuk with driver
Drink and cold towel during the day
Snack lunch at temple

The budget and term for this project are as the following:

- Budget: USD3,650.00

- Term: By working step by step, our hotel will  take 12 months to complete the project

IV.Future Projection Extension 
This is the first project we undertake and we will not end at this point but we will undertake the next one with which we will consider regarding social welfare and sanitation awareness.

V.Proclaim 
We are taking this opportunity to announce that we accept all your donations in any amount in order to speed up the project so that we will be able to undertake the next activity as mentioned above.
Mebon Primary School is now educating more than 140 young students from grade 1 to grade 6. Study materials are also in need.

For more information, please contact us at the address we provide above. It is our pleasure to respond to you and share further details.

VI.Appreciation 
Sabara Angkor Hotel & Siem Reap based in Siem Reap, the Kingdom of Cambodia, would like to express our sincere appreciation for your effort and kind contribution especially your continued support for our initiatives.


Thursday, November 1, 2018

Apsara Performace





Please be announced that our hotel regularly organizes Apsara Performance at the hotel pool pavilion with free admission for all our hotel guests.
At the same time, we prepare mouthwatering BBQ with selection of Seafood, Chicken, Beef, Vegetables and Rice that you can pick-up for your dinner or you can order A La Carte from the menu. The charge for foods and drinks will be applied accordingly to the prices set in the menu. The schedule is as the following:

Venue:                       Pool pavilion
Show started:            19:30 till 20:30 (1 hour perform)
Date:                           On every Monday and Thursday of the week
Dinner:                       18:00 till 22:00

If you do not prefer enjoying your dinner with us, you still can enjoy the show. Therefore, we cordially invite you for an ambient evening and experience with us.

NOTE: The swimming pool is not closed during the time framed but there will be no sunbeds. We do apologize regarding the sunbeds and thank you for your kind understanding.

For more information, please contact us 



The brief Story 

Blessing Dace

The dance is performed by a group of young Khmer girls to wish for good health, happiness, prosperity and success. The blessing dance was first performed in Cambodia to rid the royal palace of evil spirits and bless the Royal Kingdom.  Today it is performed to bless events and welcome guests as well as the delegates

The dance features graceful and elegant movements, holding golden goblets. Inside the goblets are flower blossoms. The blossoms are symbolic representations of blessings from the Gods. As the dancers pluck the blossoms from the goblets and gently toss them forward the audience, the gesture symbolizes the blessings of the Gods falling upon the audience

Coconut Shell Dance

Coconut Shell Danc has been a legacy of Khmer people for a long time. This traditional folk dance was originated from Romeas Hek district in Svay Rieng Province. This Dance is performed during the wedding ceremony (Groom Procession) and other festivals for cheering the atmosphere.

Fishing Dace.
This lively folk dance depicts the daily life of Khmer farmers and fishermen, who dance with traditional bamboo fishing equipment. Traditionally, fishing quarters often served as a meeting place for young couples. A charming courting scene ends the piece with playful teasing among the young men and women, making this dance very popular among audiences today.

Golden Fish Dance. 
Sovann Maccha is a short scene of a classical ballet which extracted from the Cambodian Ramayana. It is an episode of King Ram’s mobilizing force to set up a rock dam to liberate his wife. The mobilizing force was under the command of Hanuman, the chief of the monkey forces. In this scene, the Golden fish tries to destroy the bridge. While Hanuman realizes that his bridge is being taken a part, he finds himself falling in love with Golden Fish.




Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Social Work

Sabara Angkor Resort & Spa


We are Cambodian entrepreneurs who start with a business in Phnom Penh and expand to Siem Reap with tourism-related which is a new initiative for us. Despite this, we love it and proud to receive heart-warming feedbacks from our guest.”


Perfectly located merely 15 minute from the world re-known Angkor Complex and only 4 minutes from Siem Reap International Airport, Sabara Angkor Resort & Spa situated in the tranquil part of Siem Reap away from the bustling downtown area, while remaining very accessible to any part of the city within 10 minute ride. 

The epitome of peaceful Khmer style and comfort, guest rooms and suites all command magnificent swimming pool views surrounded by lefty garden. Intelligently designed, marrying traditional style elements with all the conveniences of state-of-the-art technology and the Sabara Angkor Resort & Spa personal touch service, guests are guaranteed a memorable stay.

Not only with business have we focused, but also social work since we grow up here in the ancient land and realize there are things we could give back too. We love helping each other especially contributing to our young under privileged for a better education and job opportunity










For details, please click here

Saturday, April 14, 2018

សួរស្តីឆ្នាំថ្មី Khmer New Tear




Cambodian New Year is the name of the Cambodian holiday that celebrates the traditional Lunar New Year. The holiday lasts for three days beginning on New Year's Day, which usually falls on April 14th, 15th and 16th which is the end of the harvesting season, when farmers enjoy the fruits of their labor before the rainy season begins. Khmers living abroad may choose to celebrate during a weekend rather than just specifically April 14th through 16th. The Khmer New Year coincides with the traditional solar New Year in several parts of India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Myanmar and Thailand

The three days of the New Year 

Maha Sangkran: derived from Sanskrit Maha Sangkranta, is the name of the first day of the New Year celebration. It is the end of the year and the beginning of a new one. People dress up and light candles and burn incense sticks at shrines, where the members of each family pay homage to offer thanks for the Buddha's teachings by bowing, kneeling and prostrating themselves three times before his image. For good luck people wash their face with holy water in the morning, their chests at noon, and their feet in the evening before they go to bed.

Vireak Vanabat: is the name of the second day of the New Year celebration. People contribute charity to the less fortunate by helping the poor, servants, homeless, and low-income families. Families attend a dedication ceremony to their ancestors at monasteries

T'ngai Loeng Sak: in Khmer is the name of the third day of the New Year celebration. Buddhists wash the Buddha statues and their elders with perfumed water. Bathing the Buddha images is a symbolic practice to wash bad actions away like water clean dirt from household items. It is also thought to be a kind deed that will bring longevity, good luck, happiness and prosperity in life. By washing their grandparents and parents, the children can obtain from them best wishes and good pieces of advice to live the life for the rest of the year.

                                             Seven angels and the New Year riddle



On Saturday, the angel named Mohurea Tevy or Saturday angle wears Trokeat flower tucked behind her ear and sapphires around her neck. She dines on deer meat. On her right hand, she carries a disc of power and on her left hand a trident. Mohurea rides the peacock. The Saturday angel – is one of seven daughters born on seven different days to a mythical king of the gods. Each year, a different daughter ushers in each day of the New Year.

The decapitation is at the center of the myth that enlivens Khmer New Year – a myth that has been passed down from generations. It concerns a contest of wits between the king of the gods, Kabel Moha Prom, and an ingenious son of a tycoon, Thamabal, whose intelligence was so broad he could interpret the singing of birds. As the young man’s fame spread and admiration for him rose, Kabel Moha Prom grew so jealous that he decided to descend to the Earth and challenge him to a duel of wits.

He challenged Thamabal with a riddle, saying whoever came up with the best answer in seven days would win, and that the other would lose his head. Thamabal agreed.

The riddle Kabel Moha Prom asked Thamabal to answer was: “What is the happiness in the morning, at noon and in the evening?”
Thamabal spent six days wandering around the forest, but he still could not find the answer. In fear and despair, he sat under a palm tree to contemplate the king’s riddle. Luckily, Thamabal heard a pair of eagles talking to each other.



The female eagle asked, “What will we have to eat tomorrow?” The male eagle answered, “We will have the fresh flesh of Thamabal as our food. Tomorrow he will be dead, because he cannot respond to Kabel Moha Prom’s riddle.”   

The female eagle nodded and asked, “Do you know the answers?”

“Of course, I do know the answers,” the male replied. “The happiness in the morning is face. So every morning, Cambodian people always wash their face. The happiness at noon is chest. So at midday, people always take water to wash their chest. Happiness in the evening is feet. In the evening or before going to bed, they always clean their legs.”

As soon as Thamabal heard the answer, he returned to Kabel Moha Prom and solved the riddle.
Kabel Moha Prom was mighty. If his head fell on Earth, the fire would burn the earth. If they threw it into the air, the water in the clouds would evaporate. If they threw it into the sea, it would dry up the oceans. To protect the world from the damage, his seven daughters were required to take care of their father’s head in turns for a year each.   

In the first year, his head was given to the eldest daughter, Toungsa Devi or the Sunday angel. She respectfully kept her father’s head on the tray and proceeded among other angels around the Mount Sumeru (the legendary home of the gods) for one hour before they took it to place at the Mount Kailash, its sanctuary. Every year, each daughter went through the ritual. Because Khmer New Year falls on Saturday this year, Mohurea Tevy takes her turn. 

She and other angels will accompany the head of Kabel Moha Prom for its procession around Mount Sumeru for 60 minutes before they bring it back to rest at Mount Kailash. Kemira Tevy, the Friday angel, will then turn custodianship of the head to Kemera Devi before she leaves the earth.  
At every house in Cambodia, people will make a shrine by placing biscuits, fruit, face powder, juice and flowers to welcome the new angel. They will light candles and incense sticks and pray for the new angel to protect them and bring them prosperity.

New Year’s Customs



In temples, people erect a sand hillock on temple grounds. They mound up a big pointed hill of sand or dome in the center which represents Valuka Chaitya, the stupa at Tavatimsa where the Buddha's hair and diadem are buried. The big stupa is surrounded by four small ones, which represent the stupas of the Buddha's favorite disciples: Sariputta, Moggallana, Ananda, and Maha Kassapa. There is another tradition called Sraung Preah: pouring water or liquid plaster (a mixture of water with some chalk powder) on elder relative, or people (mostly the younger generation is responsible for pouring the water).

The Khmer New Year is also a time to prepare special dishes. One of these is a "kralan": a cake made from steamed rice mixed with beans or peas, grated coconut and coconut milk. The mixture is stuffed inside a bamboo stick and slowly roasted. 

Traditional Games

Cambodia is home to a variety of games played to transform the dull days into memorable occasions. These games are similar to those played in Manipur, a north-eastern state in India. Throughout the Khmer New Year, street corners often are crowded with friends and families enjoying a break from routine, filling their free time with dancing and games. Typically, Khmer games help maintain one's mental and physical dexterity.

Chol Chhoung: A game played especially on the first nightfall of the Khmer New Year by two groups of boys and girls. Ten or 20 people comprise each group, standing in two rows opposite each other. One group throws the "chhoung" to the other group. When it is caught, it will be rapidly thrown back to the first group. If someone is hit by the "chhoung," the whole group must dance to get the "chhoung" back while the other group sings to the dance.


Chab Kon Kleng: A game played by imitating a hen as she protects her chicks from a crow. Adults typically play this game on the night of the first New Year's Day. Participants usually appoint a strong player to play the hen who protects "her" chicks, while another person is picked to be the "crow". While both sides sing a song of bargaining, the crow tries to catch as many chicks as possible as they hide behind the hen.


Bos Angkunh: The simple style consists of just throwing the Ongkunhs to hit the target Ongkunhs. The extended style adds five more stages in addition to the throwing stage. Both styles end with a penalty called Jours-activity that the winning team members get to perform on the losing team members. The Jours-activity is performed by using the Onkunghs the hit the knees of the losing team.


Leak Kanseng: A game played by a group of children sitting in a circle. Someone holding a "kanseng" (Cambodian towel) that is twisted into a round shape walks around the circle while singing a song. The person walking secretly tries to place the "kanseng" behind one of the children. If that chosen child realizes what is happening, he or she must pick up the "kanseng" and beat the person sitting next to him or her.



Bay Khom: A game played by two children in rural or urban areas during their leisure time. Ten holes are dug in the shape of an oval into a board in the ground. The game is played with 42 small beads, stones or fruit seeds. Before starting the game, five beads are put into each of the two holes located at the tip of the board. Four beads are placed in each of the remaining eight holes. The first player takes all the beads from any hole and drops them one by one in the other holes. He or she must repeat this process until they have dropped the last bead into a hole that lies besides any empty one. Then they must take all the beads in the hole that follows the empty one. At this point, the second player may have his turn. The game ends when all the holes are empty. The player with the greatest number of beads wins the game. It is possibly similar to congkak.